CP and CPF share experience in the field of human rights at 2019 UN Forum


BANGKOK (NNT) - Dr.Netithorn Praditsarn, the deputy secretary of Global Compact Network Thailand and a representative of Charoen Pokphand Group; and Mr. Wuthichai Sithipreedanant, the senior vice president for corporate social responsibility and sustainable development of Charoen Pokphand Foods PLC (CPF) recently joined the 2019 UN Forum on Business and Human Rights: Multi stakeholders initiatives promoted by States to drive business respect for human rights - effectiveness and lessons learned.   The session at the annual forum in Geneva, Switzerland focused on innovative multi-stakeholder approaches to drive business respect for human rights and human rights protection.   At the session, CP Group and CPF’s representatives shared CPF’s experiences in cooperating with other stakeholders in lifting the human rights standards of Thailand’s fishing industry.   CPF was a founder of Seafood Task Force, a network dedicated to tackle illegal fishing and human rights violations as well as ensure the industry’s sustainability. Seafood Task Force’s outstanding performance helped encourage the European Union to lift a yellow card for Thailand.   CPF affirmed zero direct involvement with the fishing industry. However, CPF was inspired to join Seafood Task Force from the beginning due to its leading position in the agribusiness and food industry and commitment towards sustainable business operations.   Mr. Wuthichai attributed Seafood Task Force’s success to 3 key factors.   First, collaboration of multi-stakeholders from relevant business enterprises, customers, foreign retailers and civic society to the government which brainstormed for solutions. Importantly, the private sector played a crucial role in supporting the government’s operations: for example, Department of Fisheries’ vessel monitoring system (VMS) installation project; and the establishment of Fishermen Life Enhancement Center (FLEC) in Songkhla province by CPF in cooperation with Fish Marketing Organization under Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives, the Department of Labor Protection and Welfare, the Planned Parenthood Association of Thailand, and Stella Maris Seafarers Center Songkhla to actively prevent and tackle human trafficking as well as improve the quality of life of laborers and their families.   Second, conformity of public-private operations that cover the entire supply chain, to avoid redundancies and improve policy cooperation. Lastly, Seafood Task Force’s replication. Matter-of-factly, the network is an extended version of Shrimp Task Force and covers the entire fishing industry. At present, Seafood Task Force’s members represent more than 50 organizations and this practice will be replicated to other ASEAN countries including Vietnam. BANGKOK (NNT) - Dr.Netithorn Praditsarn, the deputy secretary of Global Compact Network Thailand and a representative of Charoen Pokphand Group; and Mr. Wuthichai Sithipreedanant, the senior vice president for corporate social responsibility and sustainable development of Charoen Pokphand Foods PLC (CPF) recently joined the 2019 UN Forum on Business and Human Rights: Multi stakeholders initiatives promoted by States to drive business respect for human rights - effectiveness and lessons learned.   The session at the annual forum in Geneva, Switzerland focused on innovative multi-stakeholder approaches to drive business respect for human rights and human rights protection.   At the session, CP Group and CPF’s representatives shared CPF’s experiences in cooperating with other stakeholders in lifting the human rights standards of Thailand’s fishing industry.   CPF was a founder of Seafood Task Force, a network dedicated to tackle illegal fishing and human rights violations as well as ensure the industry’s sustainability. Seafood Task Force’s outstanding performance helped encourage the European Union to lift a yellow card for Thailand.   CPF affirmed zero direct involvement with the fishing industry. However, CPF was inspired to join Seafood Task Force from the beginning due to its leading position in the agribusiness and food industry and commitment towards sustainable business operations.   Mr. Wuthichai attributed Seafood Task Force’s success to 3 key factors.   First, collaboration of multi-stakeholders from relevant business enterprises, customers, foreign retailers and civic society to the government which brainstormed for solutions. Importantly, the private sector played a crucial role in supporting the government’s operations: for example, Department of Fisheries’ vessel monitoring system (VMS) installation project; and the establishment of Fishermen Life Enhancement Center (FLEC) in Songkhla province by CPF in cooperation with Fish Marketing Organization under Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives, the Department of Labor Protection and Welfare, the Planned Parenthood Association of Thailand, and Stella Maris Seafarers Center Songkhla to actively prevent and tackle human trafficking as well as improve the quality of life of laborers and their families.   Second, conformity of public-private operations that cover the entire supply chain, to avoid redundancies and improve policy cooperation. Lastly, Seafood Task Force’s replication. Matter-of-factly, the network is an extended version of Shrimp Task Force and covers the entire fishing industry. At present, Seafood Task Force’s members represent more than 50 organizations and this practice will be replicated to other ASEAN countries including Vietnam. written by National News Bureau & Public Relations
Administrator 2019-11-28

Baan Tulakorpalus - a model cooperative in Narathiwat to fight against IUU fishing


Today, we’ll take you to Baan Tulakorpalus, a fishing village chosen as a model of marine resource conservation and a leader in the elimination of illegal, unregulated and unreported (IUU) fishing, with support from the government. Currently, it is the only village with a fishing cooperative in Narathiwat province.   Mustopa Useng, president of the Baan Tulakorpalus fishing group, told us that villagers from Ban Khao Tanyong and Ban Tulakorpalus got together in 2010 to find ways to protect their marine resources and aquatic creatures. They resolved to prohibit the use of illegal fishing equipment and ban fishermen from other villages from fishing in their areas.   In 2015, the government implemented measures to combat IUU fishing and support the recovery of marine ecosystems. Tulakorpalus village was then able to set up a fisheries cooperative located Kaluwo Nuea subdistrict, Muang Narathiwat district. This cooperative currently has 58 members.   "In the past, illegal fishing nets were used. After the government addressed the problem of illegal fishing nets, the marine environment improved. Fishermen are restricted to fishing on certain days, and only small boats are allowed. The fishing cooperative was set up to help the local fishermen have sustainable livelihoods," Mustopa said.   Prapatpong Taksinsamphan, head of fishing management in the Narathiwat Provincial Fisheries Office, said the fishery group has cooperated with the government to address IUU fishing and follow the royal initiatives of His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej the Great (Rama IX).   The group has strengthened the fishing village and brought other benefits to the locals. This is the origin of the fishing cooperative. Abdulroyah Arwae, vice president of the Baan Tulakorpalus fishing group, said the villagers have joined forces to set up this community organization to oversee marine resources, and they have become stronger. The fishing cooperative will support the local fishermen and improve their livelihoods.   Chana Amornwat, director of the cooperative promotion of Narathiwat Provincial Cooperative Office, said this is the only fishing cooperative in the southernmost province. It was established in August this year to provide fishing equipment to local fishermen and manage their product distribution.   "It’s not only fishermen. Farmers have to get together and help each other. They will have more negotiation power when they buy or sell their produce. Setting up a cooperative is better than other methods because it is a legal entity and can carry out many activities. It is also supported by civil agencies," he added.   The fisheries cooperative of Tulakorpalus village has many strong points and it is looking for ways to enhance them further.   Related agencies will have to support the processing of their products to increase their value, while encouraging 12 other fishing villages to form their own cooperatives like the one in Tulakorpalus village. The cooperatives benefit everyone and they can continue to live together peacefully written by National News Bureau & Public Relations,  Thai Source : https://thainews.prd.go.th/th/news/detail/TCATG191028090803494
Administrator 2019-10-30

How the EU stamped down on decades of illegal fishing in Thailand


In a tightened up policing of their fishing industry Thailand has begun intercepting and inspecting fishing boats far out at sea this year, one of many new measures to curb its dangerously high levels of overfishing. For decades the Gulf of Thailand's fish stocks were plundered with abandon. Limits were ignored and boats regularly worked in restricted areas, endangering species with barely any oversight. Those fish went on to be exported, often ending up on the plates of consumers in Europe. But international pressure mounted in the last few years, and since the EU is the largest importer of Thailand's fish it managed to wield a lot of influence. In 2015 the EU issued a “yellow card,” warning the Thai government it would suspend its imports if no action was taken, and in January it was finally lifted and a "green card" was awarded. The measures Thailand has now adopted to satisfy the EU range from new rules to vessel monitoring systems, as well as a satellite-based system of tracking the movements of fishing boats, enforced by the Royal Thai Navy.   Thai officials say Europe’s pressure has helped them to implement these reforms, convincing the fisheries to accept tightened control. “As the biggest importer of the seafood of the world, I think the EU is using its power trying to solve the problem. That’s why we’re not complaining about the yellow card at all. And the yellow card for us is like a wake-up call: OK, you know the problem, now you have to wake up and do something significant,” Adisorn Promthep, the Director–General of Thailand's Department of Fisheries, told Euronews. “Since the yellow card was issued, the Commission and Thailand have engaged in a constructive process of cooperation and dialogue,” the European Commission, the executive arm of the EU, said in a statement in February announcing the lifting of the card. “This has resulted in a major upgrade of the Thai fisheries governance, in accordance with the international commitments of the country.” Thai seafood exports stood at 1.85 billion euros in 2017, Commerce Ministry data show, recovering to their 2014 level after a drop in 2015 to 1.6 billion euros following the European Union warning. About 9.9 percent of Thai seafood exports went to the European Union last year, versus 10.3 percent in 2014, ministry data show. Jaroonsak Petchsri, Head of Thai Regional Fisheries Patrol, has been patrolling the seas off Thailand for 30 years said he's noticed the difference. "In the past, we didn’t really have much control over the fisheries… They were depleting the sea, harvesting fish big and small, removing it in spawning seasons. Now, with the new laws, these things have changed," he told Euronews. Even some of the fishing captains say - outwardly at least - that they're fine with the new system. “I agree that all the illegal fishing has to end. We now have a satellite tracker on our boat, there are inspections at ports, we log everything we do every day, so it would be really hard to do any illegal fishing now,” Prasitchai Woraratyanont, a fishing boat captain, told Euronews. Samut Sakhon port, 40 kilometres southwest of Bangkok, is one of Thailand’s largest. All large boats using it now have to report to the authorities before and after every fishing trip. Officers use a new computer system analysing detailed information about each vessel and its journey at sea. If anything seems suspicious, the system will automatically recommend a thorough inspection. “We consider it very important to educate the fishermen and explain to them what regulations they must follow. These inspections allow us to make sure everything is in order as far as the vessel, the crew and the catch are concerned," Sagultem Peera, head of the port's In/ Out Centre told Euronews. And back at the Department of Fisheries' brand new monitoring centre in Bangkok roughly 6000 fishing vessels, all equipped with satellite trackers, are watched around the clock. “We are receiving data on the speed and direction of each boat in real time. If a trawler has slowed down, fishing in a restricted zone, we’ll start the procedure to intercept,” Bundit Kullavanijaya, Head of Vessel Monitoring System workgroup, Thailand Department of Fisheries, said. Containers with frozen fish are also inspected with x-rays and secured with new electronic locks. Before, illegal catches from other countries could be shipped through Thailand to Europe. Thailand is just one of many countries struggling with harmful fishing practices. An estimated one-fifth of all worldwide catches are illegal, unreported, or unregulated — globally that’s 10 billion euros per year.     Some illegal catches would often land in Thailand on refrigerated cargo ships. Some of these huge vessels were getting their daily catch from smaller, illegal fishing boats on the high seas — a practice called “fish laundering.” Now foreign flag vessels are not allowed into Thai ports anymore unless their cargo is properly certified. “Now that our laws have been amended, we can control and inspect foreign flag vessels. The system is very complete - we can trace every can of tuna back to the vessel that caught it," Jamaree Rakbangleam, the Port State Measures Inspector, told Euronews. ------------------------------ written by : euronews
Administrator 2019-10-04

Department of Fisheries confidence in Thai Shrimp Industry – provides consumers with high quality and standard products, food safety, uses technological friendly to the environment with social responsibility


Department of Fisheries confidence in  Thai Shrimp Industry – provides consumers with high quality and standard products, food safety, uses technological friendly to the environment  with social responsibility "Sustainability trend" is one of the critical issues that consumers around the world are aware of, “food security” “food safety" "resource sustainability and environmental impact", as well as "good labor practices" is included. As the world's largest producer of aquatic products, Thailand has given priority to "sustainability", in this way, production of quality food to meets international standards with regard to food safety, environmentally friendly and social responsibility for building consumer confidence has been attached the importance. Under the Royal Ordinance on Fisheries 2015 and its amendment, Thailand has implemented a systematic fishery reform encompassing fisheries, aquaculture, processing, as well as traceability systems in order to strengthen fishery development and to head towards the sustainability. Especially for aquaculture promotion, its objectives have clearly been defined to “taking into account the economic, social and environment in long-term, maintaining the balance of the ecosystem, and enhancing consumer confidence in quality and hygiene of aquaculture products", this is to ensure that any aquaculture promotion will aim to "sustainability". Dr. Adisorn Promthep, the Director-General of the Department of Fisheries, said that "marine shrimp" is an important economic species that generate incomes into Thailand from its exports. Thailand has encountered many problems, whether they be environmental challenges, disease outbreak crisis causing the decrease of the competitiveness of Thailand in the global market. However, the Department of Fisheries confidence that the "Thai shrimps" are still in high demand in the global market, therefore,  to ensure the sustainability of the Thai shrimp aquaculture industry, under the Royal Ordinance on Fisheries 2015 and its amendment, shrimp aquaculture has been controlled to guarantee the quality of aquaculture process and to prevent environmental impact or harm to consumers and the industry by starting from; Aquaculture zoning process: the Provincial Fisheries Committee will determine the appropriate area for marine shrimp aquaculture to ensure that there will be no shrimp farming operations in the areas where it may cause the impact to the environment or the other business. The entrepreneurs shall apply for their shrimp farm registration to the Department of Fisheries. They must provide the Department of Fisheries with the certificate of land ownership and the farms must not be located in mangrove or conservation areas. These regulations reflect the strictness of law enforcement to protect the environment in Thailand. Aquaculture control process: The Department of Fisheries has implemented Good Aquaculture Practices (GAP) and Thai Agricultural Standard (TAS) 7422 - 2018 for marine shrimp hatchery and nursery establishments which is one of the national standards to certify farm standards. This standard covers every step in practice from hatcheries, grow-out farms, harvesting, and processing in order to get standard and good quality shrimp production, and safety for consumers. The Department of Fisheries encourages shrimp farmers to culture shrimp by using a water recirculation system in a closed system to reduce the use of natural water and discharge of wastewater into environment. Wastewater from the pond will be treated using biological technology before recirculating,  utilizing effective probiotic is also supported for the degradation of organic matter and control of pathogenic bacteria in order to reduce drugs and chemicals used for aquaculture. Process for diseases monitoring in aquatic animals and chemicals used for aquaculture: regarding the problems on "disease", the Department of Fisheries has conducted lot by lot inspection of shrimp larvae in every production lot to certify their disease-free status. Accordingly, farmers can access good quality and disease-free shrimp larvae. Moreover, the national measures to monitor inputs using in aquaculture has been laid down, including a plan to inspect drugs and chemicals used in farms and released in input stores. Besides, the regular monitoring for drug and chemical used in aquaculture systems has been implemented. The final process is the exploitation of labour in shrimp industry: the Department of Fisheries cooperate with all sectors, in order to promote the implementation of the Good Labour Practices (GLP), which complies to the labour laws on the issues of child labour, slave labour, and forced labour. Upon the aforementioned process, it can guarantee that "marine shrimp aquaculture of Thailand" has been operated friendly with the environment, free from drugs and antibiotic residues. Marine shrimp distributed in both domestic and international markets can be traced throughout the production line and this will be an important basis of "Thai shrimp" to secure the further step. The Director-General of the Department of Fisheries concluded that Thai marine shrimp industry relates three major components: upstream, midstream and downstream, as well as a number of stakeholders, farmers, establishments, and exporters (from farm to table). The mutual trust and cooperation from all sectors will be an important condition to support the management of Thai shrimp aquaculture towards sustainability in the future,  it will also contribute to the sustainability of the farmer careers and other stakeholders throughout the supply chain.   ------------------------------ written by the Department of Fisheries, Thailand published by Gnews
Administrator 2019-09-03

Seminar on post-IUU fishery sector


BANGKOK, 31 July 2019 (NNT) - After Thailand obtained a green card as an IUU-free country from the European Union, civil society got a glimpse of the improved situation of fisheries’ workers. A seminar entitled ’’After IUU, go forward or stay put Potential and challenges in Thailand’s fisheries’’ has been organized by the Asian Research Center for Migration, of Chulalongkorn University’s Institute of Asian Studies in cooperation with the Thai Civil Society’s Coalition for Sustainable and Ethical Seafood. The Department of Labor Protection and Welfare’s Deputy Director General, Somboon Traisilanand said today the labor situation has gradually improved following the removal of the IUU yellow card. However, authorities have continued to strictly enforce the law in line with international standards. Besides, the law has been amended to facilitate the employment of migrant workers from three foreign countries in a convenient, prompt and fair manner. In particular, legislation for the protection of workers in the fishing sector will be enacted in November. Crewmembers on fishing boats are protected by welfare and safety measures. Officials regularly inspect fishing boats and workers in 22 coastal provinces to alleviate the concerns of the International Labor Organization over the payment of monthly wages to fishery workers. For instance, some workers’ ATM cards attached to accounts into which their wages were paid were allegedly seized by others. Suthasini Kaewleklai of the Migrant Workers Rights Organization said this week that the fisheries’ labor situation has improved, given the amended legal protection. However, some problems remain unresolved and have been made more complicated. The authorities are urged to take proactive measures to help fishery workers who may still be mistreated.   written by National News Bureau & Public Relations
Administrator 2019-07-31

Stop IUU Fishing Award


Winners of the 2019 STOP IUU FISHING AWARDS were officially announced February 21, 2019 at the 6th Global Fisheries Enforcement Training Workshop (GFETW) held in Bangkok, Thailand. Michele Kuruc, Vice-President of Ocean Policy of the WorldWildlife Fund and Todd Dubois, Chairman of the International MCS Network, presented the awards to: First Place:  Pacific Island Forum Fisheries Agency for its Integrated MCS Framework.   Second place: Thailand’s Department of Fisheries for its Fish Product Traceability System. Third Place:   Co-awarded to Spain’s General Secretariat of Fisheries/Secretaría General de Pesca de España for Regulatory Reform and Operation Sparrow; and Peru, on behalf of all counties which participate in the Network for the exchange of information and experience among countries of Latin America and the Caribbean to prevent, deter and eliminate IUU fishing, in Spanish language: Red de Intercambio de información y experiencias entre países de América Latina y El Caribe para Prevenir, Desalentar y Eliminar la Pesca INDNR.   for more details please read ..... Summary Report of Thailand “Fish Product Traceability System: The key tool for Combating IUU Fishing of Thailand” The Department of Fisheries, Thailand has developed two electronic traceability systems. The purpose is to increase the efficiency and capacity of Thailand’s traceability system in relation to both domestically produced and imported fish and fish products.  In relation to domestically produced, the Thai flagged Catch Certification System (TF system) is initiated upon the landing of the fish at port, its onward purchasing, its processing until the Catch Certificate is issued. This system is linked with Fishing Info data analysis system which controls Thai-flagged fishing vessel prior to and during fishing as well as the landing of fish under the Port In inspection system. Thailand has the abillity to effecively control all fishing activities by its domestic fishing vessels both inside and outside of Thai waters. Regarding imported fish, the PSM linked Processing Statement System (PPS) has been fully implemented to effectively trace and therefore control imported fish from the point of landing through the exporting process. This system greatly increases the transparency and accountability within the fish products chain of custody. Both electronic traceability systems enable Thailand’s traceability system to be more effective. These are important innovations which significantly increase the capacity and capability of DOF officials to control fish and fish products throughout fish product flow. The most important aspect of these systems is the support provided through the information exchange involving all stakeholders. This significant increase in transparency has developed a competent traceability system that ensures that no IUU fish enters the international supply chain through Thailand. ------------------------------ source : the 6th Global Fisheries Enforcement Training Workshop
Administrator 2019-02-21